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Bekijk volle/desktop versie : Ook chimpansees hebben politieagenten



Hominid
08-03-2012, 18:02


Chimpanzees Have Police Officers, Too ScienceDaily (Mar. 7, 2012) — Chimpanzees are interested in social cohesion and have various strategies to guarantee the stability of their group. Anthropologists now reveal that chimpanzees mediate conflicts between other group members, not for their own direct benefit, but rather to preserve the peace within the group. Their impartial intervention in a conflict -- so-called "policing" -- can be regarded as an early evolutionary form of moral behavior. Conflicts are inevitable wherever there is cohabitation. This is no different with our closest relatives, the chimpanzees. Sound conflict management is crucial for group cohesion. Individuals in chimpanzee communities also ensure that there is peace and order in their group. This form of conflict management is called "policing" -- the impartial intervention of a third party in a conflict. Until now, this morally motivated behavior in chimpanzees was only ever documented anecdotally. However, primatologists from the University of Zurich can now confirm that chimpanzees intervene impartially in a conflict to guarantee the stability of their group. They therefore exhibit prosocial behavior based on an interest in community concern. The more parties to a conflict there are, the more policing there is The willingness of the arbitrators to intervene impartially is greatest if several quarrelers are involved in a dispute as such conflicts particularly jeopardize group peace. The researchers observed and compared the behavior of four different captive chimpanzee groups. At Walter Zoo in Gossau, they encountered special circumstances: "We were lucky enough to be able to observe a group of chimpanzees into which new females had recently been introduced and in which the ranking of the males was also being redefined. The stability of the group began to waver. This also occurs in the wild," explains Claudia Rudolf von Rohr, the lead author of the study. High-ranking arbitrators Not every chimpanzee makes a suitable arbitrator. It is primarily high-ranking males or females or animals that are highly respected in the group that intervene in a conflict. Otherwise, the arbitrators are unable to end the conflict successfully. As with humans, there are also authorities among chimpanzees. "The interest in community concern that is highly developed in us humans and forms the basis for our moral behavior is deeply rooted. It can also be observed in our closest relatives," concludes Rudolf von Rohr. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120307185016.htm

Joost
08-03-2012, 18:07
Eerder deze week nog een artikel gelezen over hoe de Bonobo verschilt van de Chimpansee in die zin dat de Bonobo zichzelf min of meer getemd heeft: veel minder aggressie en derhalve veel meer sociale cohesie. Blijkbaar hebben Chimpansees dat dus ook, in wat mindere mate. :)

Hominid
08-03-2012, 18:21
Eerder deze week nog een artikel gelezen over hoe de Bonobo verschilt van de Chimpansee in die zin dat de Bonobo zichzelf min of meer getemd heeft: veel minder aggressie en derhalve veel meer sociale cohesie. Blijkbaar hebben Chimpansees dat dus ook, in wat mindere mate. :)Hoe harder een maatschappij, hoe meer politie er nodig is. Bonobo's hebben het wat dat betreft perfect voor elkaar. :)

Pist_Aches
08-03-2012, 18:24
http://i40.tinypic.com/3wkye.jpg

Joost
09-03-2012, 08:28


http://i40.tinypic.com/3wkye.jpg hihi, leuk altijd :)